Skip Nav

What Is the Definition of Report Writing?

Initial planning

❶The three main halls of the PPIE were filled with modern creations of the day and were an excellent representation of the innovative spirit of the Progressive era.

Preparation and Planning

What Is an After-Action Report Template?
Presentation and Style
What is a report?

Be sure to leave time for final proof reading and checking. This first stage is the most important. You need to be confident that you understand the purpose of your report as described in your report brief or instructions.

Consider who the report is for and why it is being written. Check that you understand all the instructions or requirements, and ask your tutor if anything is unclear. Once you are clear about the purpose of your report, you need to begin to gather relevant information. Your information may come from a variety of sources, but how much information you will need will depend on how much detail is required in the report. You may want to begin by reading relevant literature to widen your understanding of the topic or issue before you go on to look at other forms of information such as questionnaires, surveys etc.

As you read and gather information you need to assess its relevance to your report and select accordingly. Keep referring to your report brief to help you decide what is relevant information. Once you have gathered information you need to decide what will be included and in what sequence it should be presented. Begin by grouping together points that are related. These may form sections or chapters. Remember to keep referring to the report brief and be prepared to cut any information that is not directly relevant to the report.

Choose an order for your material that is logical and easy to follow. Before you begin to write your first draft of the report, take time to consider and make notes on the points you will make using the facts and evidence you have gathered. What conclusions can be drawn from the material? What are the limitations or flaws in the evidence?

Do certain pieces of evidence conflict with one another? It is not enough to simply present the information you have gathered; you must relate it to the problem or issue described in the report brief. Having organised your material into appropriate sections and headings you can begin to write the first draft of your report. You may find it easier to write the summary and contents page at the end when you know exactly what will be included.

Aim for a writing style that is direct and precise. Avoid waffle and make your points clearly and concisely. Chapters, sections and even individual paragraphs should be written with a clear structure.

The structure described below can be adapted and applied to chapters, sections and even paragraphs. Ideally, you should leave time to take a break before you review your first draft.

Be prepared to rearrange or rewrite sections in the light of your review. Try to read the draft from the perspective of the reader. Is it easy to follow with a clear structure that makes sense? Are the points concisely but clearly explained and supported by relevant evidence? Writing on a word processor makes it easier to rewrite and rearrange sections or paragraphs in your first draft.

If you write your first draft by hand, try writing each section on a separate piece of paper to make redrafting easier. Once you are satisfied with the content and structure of your redrafted report, you can turn your attention to the presentation.

Check that you have adhered to the instructions in your report brief regarding format and presentation. Check for consistency in numbering of chapters, sections and appendices. Make sure that all your sources are acknowledged and correctly referenced. You will need to proof read your report for errors of spelling or grammar. Make a separate list, called illustrations, of any tables, illustrations, figures, charts or diagrams.

In this area include a brief description on how your research was carried out. What information was gathered? How did you use the information to come to your conclusions? This area includes a topic sentence, the methods used to reach your conclusion, the actual conclusion and any further recommendations. The Introduction should clearly state your objectives and include any terms of reference you used. This area should indicate the basic structure of your reporting.

This area may also indicate the conclusion of the report. The simpler the writing, the better. This is going to ensure overall readability. Try and structure the information in the simplest way possible, again so that readers can interpret the material without difficulty.

Also included in the main body, is the report's results. Identify your observations clearly. Include here any relevant tables, graphs, diagrams and charts supporting your results. Your conclusion should never include new material. It should only draw together the main points of your report, in a way that closes the report. Writers can include their recommendations here, or write them in a separate section.

References should be listed in alphabetical order, offering specific details about the materials you referenced to create your report.

Always write in clear and concise English, attempting to bring forward information in the easiest way possible. Often, this is with short readable sentences and paragraphs. Active is a more informal style and often used to deliver informal information.

At this point you should have a first draft of your work completed. Carefully check this first draft, adding edits where necessary.

Once the hypothesis has been formed, you can move onto experimentation. A good experiment will have a control, or a result against which other results can be gauged. For this experiment, it could be falling objects of the same dimensions and same mass.

The variable group, which is compared to the control group, could include falling objects of the same dimensions and variable masses. The results of these experiments would then be recorded accurately in pen so they cannot be changed to better suit the hypothesis. When the experiment is over, the data is analyzed. If the data correlates to the hypothesis, the hypothesis is considered to be supported.

Ideally, the experiment is then repeated to determine if the results are the same every time.

What makes a good report?

Main Topics

Privacy Policy

Some academic assignments ask for a ‘report’, rather than an essay, and students are often confused about what that really means. Likewise, in business, confronted with a request for a ‘report’ to a senior manager, many people struggle to know what to write.

Privacy FAQs

Either way, the analysis is generally published as a scientific report, which is then subject to critique by the experimenter’s peers. Ideally, the experiment is then repeated to determine if the results are the same every time.

About Our Ads

Writing the report: the essential stages. All reports need to be clear, concise and well structured. The key to writing an effective report is to allocate time for planning and preparation. With careful planning, the writing of a report will be made much easier. The essential stages of successful report writing are described below. Report Writing Format By YourDictionary Unlike an essay, which sets out and defends a writer's view about a topic and does not have to feature headings, a report discusses a topic in a structured, easy-to-follow format. Reports are divided into sections with headings and subheadings.

Cookie Info

Purpose of a report: writing to be read. A key thing to keep in mind right through your report writing process is that a report is written to be read, by someone else. This is the central goal of report-writing. A report which is written . Jul 01,  · When writing a report to your supervisor, the key thing to keep in mind is why your boss needs the report. Focus on giving her the precise information she needs to make a quality business decision.